MKTP Team 2018

Antonio Javier Morales Rondán

Egyptology


Antonio Morales is Assoc. Professor of Egyptology at the Seminar of Ancient History in the University of Alcalá (UAH, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid) and the Director of the Middle Kingdom Theban Project. Previously, he lectured at Freie Universität Berlin. He is currently organizing an Egyptological program at the University of Alcalá, mainly focused on pharaonic history, religion, language, and culture.

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Antonio Morales is Assoc. Professor of Egyptology at the Seminar of Ancient History in the University of Alcalá (UAH, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid) since January 2017, and the Director of the Middle Kingdom Theban Project. Previously, he was Lecturer in Egyptology at Freie Universität Berlin. He is currently organizing an Egyptological program at the University of Alcalá, mainly focused on pharaonic history, religion, language, and culture. The new program already includes courses on Egyptian language (Middle Egyptian, hieratic, Late Egyptian), Egyptian literatura, and ancient Egyptian magic and religion.

He received his B.A. in Archaeology from the University of Seville in 1997. Later he studied Egyptology in England at the universities of London (UCL), Oxford, Heidelberg, and Birmingham, as well as in Germany at Freie Universität Berlin. He obtained his PhD in Egyptology at the University of Pennsylvania in 2013. Antonio’s dissertation deals with the philological and cultural aspects of the transmission of the Pyramid Texts into the Middle Kingdom. His main areas of interest include Egyptian religion, ritual, particularly mortuary corpora, beliefs, and practices, as well as history and culture of the Middle Kingdom.

He has participated as archaeologist and epigrapher in several excavations in Egypt (Abydos, Aswan, Dra Abu el-Naga, El-Amra, Saqqara), and has worked as research assistant at the Department of Egyptian Antiquities in the British Museum, London. As the Head of the Middle Kingdom Theban Project, he aims at the study and publication of several tombs of the late Eleventh and early Twelfth Dynasties that deserve more attention. He coordinates the archaeological mission and focuses on the epigraphic materials resulting from the archaeological activities. In addition, in co-direction with Mohamed Osman, he is working on the study and publication of the funerary chamber of Harhotep (now in the Cairo Museum as CG 28023), originally located in Deir el-Bahari (TT 314).

He has published many articles in peer-review journals and chapters to books. In 2001 he edited a book on the production and use of beer in ancient cultures, and has co-edited with Kolb Fellow Jane Hill and Philip Jones a multicultural and interdisciplinary conference volume on Kingship, Politics, and Landscape in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013). This year he has published a monograph on the transmission of the Pyramid Texts of Nut in the Old and Middle Kingdoms (BSAK 19, Buske, 2017). In addition, as part of his research position in the Berlin project SFB 980, he is preparing a volume on the transmission of the Pyramid Texts into the Kushite and Saite period, and is currently editing a volume (in Spanish) about the major genres of religious compositions in pharaonic, grecorroman and coptic Egypt (Confluencias, 2017). He has given papers at international conferences and congresses in Egypt, the United States, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, England, Czech Republic, Portugal, and Spain.

Kelly Accetta

Archaeology


Kelly Accetta holds a Bachelor of Arts in Archaeology and Art History from the University of Virginia, a Master of Philosophy in Egyptology from the University of Cambridge, and a PhD in Archaeology, also from the University of Cambridge. Her dissertation was entitled “Thresholds of the Gods: Doorways and Movement in New Kingdom Theban Temples”.

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Kelly Accetta holds a Bachelor of Arts in Archaeology and Art History from the University of Virginia, a Master of Philosophy in Egyptology from the University of Cambridge, and a PhD in Archaeology, also from the University of Cambridge. Her dissertation was entitled “Thresholds of the Gods: Doorways and Movement in New Kingdom Theban Temples”, in which she explored the connection between the construction and decoration of doorways and their perceived and actual usage. Whilst doing her doctoral research, she spent much time in Luxor documenting and studying the doorways in situ, as well as consulting with the missions working on the temples in order to better understand how modern reconstruction and interpretation has physically altered the ancient structures.

Kelly worked last year with the Middle Kingdom Theban Project on the tomb of Henenu (TT 313), where she co-supervised the initial cleaning and documentation of the Upper Courtyard and the tomb shafts and chambers. She will resume this role in 2018, with the aim of completing the documentation of the interior of the tomb and the clearance of the Middle Courtyard. She is also involved with the excavations of the Amarna Project and the Deep History of the Asyut Region project (The British Museum).

Kelly currently holds the Rikki Breem Internship at The British Museum, where she is digitally documenting the 3000-piece shabti collection. The end goal of the project is to make available to the public up-to-date images and data about the entire collection. Her main areas of interest are stone built architecture, funerary material culture, art, and the connection between image and power.

Sergio Alarcón Robledo

Archaeology


Sergio Alarcón studied Architecture in the Technical University of Madrid (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid), and an MPhil in Egyptology at the University of Cambridge. He is doing his PhD in Egyptian Archaeology at the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, UCLA. His main area of interest is ancient Egyptian architecture, with a particular focus on Middle to Late Bronze Age temple and funerary structures in Egypt.

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Sergio Alarcón studied Architecture in the Technical University of Madrid (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid), and an MPhil in Egyptology at the University of Cambridge. He is doing his PhD in Egyptian Archaeology at the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, UCLA. His main area of interest is ancient Egyptian architecture, with a particular focus on Middle to Late Bronze Age temple and funerary structures in Egypt.

He has taken part of several archaeological missions in Egypt, and has worked with material ranging from the Old kingdom to the Ptolemaic Period (West Thebes, Qubbet el-Hawa). Since 2012, he is a permanent member of the Polish-Egyptian Archaeological and Conservation Mission of the Temple of Hatshepsut at Deir el-Bahari, where he researches the architectural elements of the Upper Courtyard. As a member of the Middle Kingdom Theban Project, he is studying architectural features of several Middle Kingdom tombs, and conducting –together with Kelly A. Accetta– the archaeological works of the tomb of Henenu (TT 313).

Mohamed Osman

Archaeology


Mohamed Osman finished his PhD in Nov. 2017 in Freie Universität Berlin. His thesis deals with trade routes and centres in ancient Egypt in Upper Egypt during the Old and Middle Kingdoms. He finished his MA in Egyptian Archaeology in 2008 from Helwan University. His main interests are archaeology, landscape archaeology and associated methods such as GIS and landscape photogrammetry.

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Mohamed Osman finished his PhD in Nov. 2017 in Freie Universität Berlin. His thesis (under the supervision of Jochem Kahl, Joanne Rowland, and Dietrich Raue) deals with trade routes and centres in ancient Egypt in Upper Egypt during the Old and Middle Kingdoms. He finished his MA in Egyptian Archaeology in 2008 from Helwan University under the supervision of Prof. Maha Farid and Prof. Layla Azzam, concentrating on "Urban Settlements in Ancient Egypt, From Pre-Dynastic Periods to the End of the Third Dynasty". His main interests are archaeology, landscape archaeology and associated methods such as GIS and landscape photogrammetry. He is also specialized on epigraphic illustrations among other kinds of archaeological documentation methods involving professional photography, digital illustrations, and 3D modelling.

He has participated in several training workshops and field schools, as he had much training as a field archaeologist in the DAIK at Elephantine (2009). He has also worked in analysis and publication in the Field School in Giza, AERA, a project co-directed by Ana Tavares and Mohsen Kamal, under the supervision of William Schenck. He was also RTI training assistant in TOPOI (Freie Universität Berlin) under Dr. Kathryn Piquett, and GIS student in the Winter School on Modeling in Landscape Archaeology in Freie Universität Berlin.

Since 2003, he has participated in several archaeological missions starting with the Durham University Expedition to Sais between 2003 and 2005. He was excavation supervisor in the SCA Expedition to the Tomb of Shemai from the FIP (Kom El-Koffar, Qift region) between 2003 and 2007, and later he worked as senior archaeologist in the Jebel Barkal Archaeological Mission in Sudan, directed by Timothy Kendall. Mohamed has also participated in several epigraphic surveys, with his most prominent contribution with the NYU Epigraphical Expedition to the temple of Ramses II at Abydos, directed by Sameh Iskander. He has also work in the SCA–National Project of Documenting Egypt Monuments between 2010 and 2012, directed by Dr. Ramadan El-Badry. He has likewise collaborated in the project dealing with the Sokar and Nefertem chapels in the temple of Seti I in Abydos under the direction of Dr. Hanane Gaber, and has produced some illustrations of stelae and statues from the Egyptian Museum in Cairo as a freelance specialist. He also worked as an associate registrar for three years in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

Sebastian Falk

Archaeology


Sebastian Falk is research assistant at the Cairo Department of the German Archaeological Institute (DAIK). He has completed his MA thesis entitled “The excavations of Hermann Junker in Merimde Beni Salama: contextualization and reexamination of the archaeological finds” in 2016. Sebastian’s work focuses on promoting scientific exchange with Egyptian scholars and organizing the DAIK scholarship program.

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Sebastian Falk is research assistant at the Cairo Department of the German Archaeological Institute (DAIK). He has completed his MA thesis entitled “The excavations of Hermann Junker in Merimde Beni Salama: contextualization and reexamination of the archaeological finds” in 2016. Besides his studies in the field of Neolithic Egypt, Sebastian’s work at the DAI Cairo focuses on promoting scientific exchange with Egyptian scholars and the organization of the DAIK scholarship program. He is also involved in DAI projects in Aswan and the Citadel area in Cairo.

Sebastian has participated in several excavations and survey projects in Egypt since 2012 as archaeologist and photographer. As an student assistant in the project “The Neolithisation of the Nile Delta” at the Excellence Cluster Topoi at Freie Universität Berlin, Sebastian has worked in museum collections in Heidelberg, Vienna, and Stockholm, and recorded objects from Merimde Beni-Salama. Furthermore, he has been student assistant in the library of the Seminar of Egyptology at FU Berlin.

In 2014, Sebastian collaborated in the publication of “Reflections on Turning Points. Egypt between January 25, 2011 and June 30, 2012” by Fayza Haikal. Since 2015, he is member of the organization team of the “Tell! Young Researchers Lecture Series” at the DAI Cairo. Last season Sebastian was the responsible for the excavation and study of the tomb of Meseh, a subsidiary tomb built in the eastern section of the upper courtyard in Ipi’s funerary complex.

Elisabeth Kruck

Archaeology


Elisabeth (MA in Egyptology, Mainz) is scientific assistant at the Seminar of Egyptology in the Freie Universität Berlin. She has recently submitted her Phd thesis about intact burials in the Middle Kingdom to the Johannes Gutenberg-University in Mainz. Her main research interests are funerary material culture, concepts of burials and the connection of archeological legacies and funerary rites.

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Elisabeth (MA in Egyptology, Mainz) is scientific assistant at the Seminar of Egyptology in the Freie Universität Berlin. She has recently submitted her Phd thesis about intact burials in the Middle Kingdom to the Johannes Gutenberg-University in Mainz. Her main research interests are funerary material culture, concepts of burials and the connection of archeological legacies and funerary rites.

Elisabeth Kruck finished her MA about funerary cones from the excavation of the German Archeological Institute in Dra’ Abu el-Naga where she was working as an archaeologist since 2005. There she was responsible for the supervision and documentation of excavation activities and the evaluation of the archaeological material. In this context, Elisabeth introduced students from different German universities to the work by the German Archeological Institute in Dra‘ Abu el-Naga.

Elisabeth’s PhD thesis, entitled “Beigabe und Abbild – Aspekte und Konzepte ungestörter Bestattungen in Saqqara und Abusir”, deals with intact burials from the Middle Kingdom, focusing on the connections and interactions between the burial equipment, images, and texts contained in the coffins. She is particularly interested in the interrelations of these elements and their interpretation in the context of the burial ritual. As a scientific assistant in the Seminar of Egyptology at FUB, Elisabeth has been teaching several courses about the archaeological legacy of the Middle and New Kingdom, and supervising students in this field of specialization.

Hazem Shared

Archaeology


Hazem Shared is an Egyptian archaeologist living in Luxor especialized on registration, management, logistical organization and ceramic work. He studied his BA in Archaeology and Egyptology at Aim Shams University, Cairo, and later initiated a long career –in spite of his young age– of participations in numerous excavations.

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Hazem Shared is an Egyptian archaeologist living in Luxor especialized on registration, management, logistical organization and ceramic work. He studied his BA in Archaeology and Egyptology at Aim Shams University, Cairo, and later initiated a long career –in spite of his young age– of participations in numerous excavations, including projects at the Karnak temple in Luxor, the tomb of Amenmesse (KV63) in the Valley of the Kings, at Dra Abu el-Naga, in Sa el-Hagar, at Deir el-Bahari, and in Kom el-Hisn.

In the MKTP he is specializing on registration, study and drawing of particular objects, mainly ceramics, relief fragments, and small objects. He has worked in this project since 2016; in his position working with objects, he discusses the study of materials with the registration archaeologists, epigraphers, and other colleagues.

Miriam Luciañez Triviño

Archaeology


Miriam Luciañez got a BA in Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property (UPV-EHU) (2008) and a Master degree in Conservation and Restoration of Cultural Heritage at the Polytechnic University of Valencia (2009). Later, she studied a Master in Archeology (University of Seville, 2012) and is currently doing her thesis on ivory manufacture in the Chalcolithic site of Valencina de la Concepción (Seville).

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Miriam Luciañez got her BA in Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property in the Faculty of Fine Arts of Leioa (UPV-EHU) (2008), and she furthered her studies in Conservation studying a Master degree in Conservation and Restoration of Cultural Heritage at the Polytechnic University of Valencia (2009). Later, she specialized on Archaeological Heritage working for a Master degree in Archeology at the University of Seville (2012), and she is currently doing her doctoral studies on Prehistory at the same university. Her doctoral research focuses on the manufacture of ivory objects in the Chalcolithic site of Valencina de la Concepción (Seville) from a technological perspective, that is, studying the possible sources and supply routes, the techniques of production of the objects, and their use/consumption by Chalcolithic groups.

Miriam has mainly specialized on the technological study of bone industry and in documentation techniques, without giving up her training as conservator-restorer. She has conducted research in Argentina, England and France as a visiting researcher. In 2014 she was at the Archaeological Computing Research Group in the University of Southampton, learning the technique of documentation and analysis called Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI). In later visits (2015 and 2016) to L'Unité Mixte de Recherche Archéologie des Sociétés Méditerranéennes (UMR 5140), LabEx ARCHIMEDE in Montpellier, she learned further methodological approaches to the technological study applied to bone assemblages (study under a binocular and microscopy of the work marks, identification of the different raw materials, recognition of procedures, evaluation of pathologies and state of conservation, etc.).

She has been part of several research projects and contributed in various conferences and seminars both in Spain and abroad. She is the author of several chapters of books and articles in prestigious academic journals, such as Quaternary International, European Journal of Archeology, and Restaurierung und Archäologie. In addition to her experience in the study of archaeological materials, she has had the opportunity to work in various campaigns for national and international projects, holding positions as restorer-archaeologist: in 2014 in Kaleburnu-Kraltepe / Galinoporni-Vasili (Cyprus) with the University of Tübingen (Germany) and Doğu Akdeniz Üniversitesi-Eastern Mediterranean University; and recently in Valencina de la Concepción (Seville), with the German Archaeological Institute of Madrid (2017).

Óscar Martínez Castro

Archaeology


Óscar Martínez has recently completed his BA in History at the University of Alcalá (2013-2017) and is currently studying an MA in Archaeology and Heritage Management in the same university in Madrid. In his early education one must identify other certificates and diplomas for the study of SIG programs, Autocad, and further topographical tools.

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Óscar Martínez has recently completed his BA in History at the University of Alcalá (2013-2017) and is currently studying an MA in Archaeology and Heritage Management in the same university in Madrid. In his early education one must identify other certificates and diplomas for the study of SIG programs, Autocad, and further topographical tools.

In addition, Óscar has worked several seasons in several archaeological excavations, and other projects for the interpretation, conservation, and management of various Madrid sites. Among his most important works, he emphasizes the conservation and management of the ceramics dating to the protocogota and cogota period in the site of La Serna, and the survey and conservation of the Medieval tombs in La Cabrera, in the northern highlands of Madrid. Aside of the fieldwork, Óscar is also working on the production of documentation reports for archaeological materials as well as the sieving, cleaning, drawing, and photography of materials. Regarding theoretical approaches, at this moment Óscar conducts some research on heritage interpretation for children, a matter that allows to test experimental archaeology techniques and new currents of interpretation in the field of museology.

Óscar´s main academic goal is to continue with his training on conservation and heritage management. For this, his plans include to participate in multiple projects in which he will be able to experience direct contact with the historical and archaeological heritage so that he can consider new interpretative methods for the most adequate understanding and transmission to the public. In addition, he intends to participate in archaeological expeditions working on prehistoric and protohistoric sites, which are of great interest for him.

Óscar Martínez is the recipient of one of the five fellowships offered by the MKTP in 2017 to UAH students specialized on History, Humanities, Archaeology, or Architecture.

Salima Ikram

Egyptology


Salima Ikram is Distinguished University Professor of Egyptology at the American University in Cairo and the Head of the Egyptology Unit. She has published extensively on funerary archaeology, animals in Egypt, and aspects of Egyptian art and daily life.

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Salima Ikram is Distinguished University Professor of Egyptology at the American University in Cairo and the Head of the Egyptology Unit. She is a participant in many Egyptian archaeological projects, the author of several books on Egyptian archaeology, a contributor to various magazines and a frequent guest on pertinent television programs. She has published extensively on funerary archaeology, animals in Egypt, and aspects of Egyptian art and daily life. She studied Egyptology and Archaeology at Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania (USA) and earned her MPhil and PhD in Egyptology at the University of Cambridge. While working for her PhD. she also trained in fauna analysis.

She has directed the Animal Mummy Project, the North Kharga Darb Ain Amur Survey, and the Valley of the Kings KV10/KV63 mission, and has co-directed the Predynastic Gallery Project, and the North Kharga Oasis Survey. She has lectured on her work all over the world and publishes in both scholarly and popular journals. Some of her most prominent monographs deal with funerary beliefs and practices, animal mummies, meat production in ancient Egypt, and the mummification practices.

As a member of the MKTP, Salima Ikram is going to examine the remains of the embalming cachette found in the complex of Ipi (TT 315), which consists on materials used during the mummification process of the vizir Ipi.

Raúl Sánchez Casado

Egyptology


Raúl Sánchez Casado holds a BA degree in History from the University of Granada (Spain) since 2011, and obtained his MA in Sciences of the Antiquity and the Middle Ages from the same University in 2012. In 2013 he was awarded a Dissertation Grant from the Spanish Ministry of Education for carrying out his PhD on the figure of the ka-servant and his functions during the Old Kingdom.

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Raúl Sánchez Casado holds a BA degree in History from the University of Granada (Spain) since 2011, and obtained his MA in Sciences of the Antiquity and the Middle Ages from the same University in 2012. In 2013 he was awarded a Dissertation Grant from the Spanish Ministry of Education for carrying out his PhD and lecturing at the Department of Ancient History in the University of Seville. He is currently writing his dissertation, whose main theme is the figure of the ka-servant and his functions during the Old Kingdom. This study is conducted under the supervision of José Miguel Serrano (University of Seville) and Antonio Morales (University of Alcalá).

Raúl has received two scholarships for conducting research as a visiting researcher at the Oriental Institute of the University of Oxford in 2014 and 2015, both under de supervision of Richard Parkinson. He has also made a research stay at the Freie Universität Berlin (2016) under the auspices of Jochem Kahl. In these institutions, he secured access to primary resources for his dissertation at the Griffith Institute, the Sackler Library, and the Freie Universität Library. In addition, he has obtained field experience through his participation in the previous two seasons of the MKTP and in various archaeological expeditions and projects in Southern Spain.

Furthermore, he has contributed to multiple conferences and seminars, and is the author of several articles. He currently works at the University of Alcalá, where he combines his research duties with research and management duties for the MKTP. His main research interest is the ancient Egyptian religion, particularly the funerary sphere, focusing in the nature of priesthood, ritual, and cultic practices.

Jónatan Ortiz García

Egyptology


Jónatan Ortiz-García holds a BA in History, a MA in Cultural Heritage (Classical Archaeology), and a PhD in Cultural Heritage (Egyptology) from the University of Valencia. While working on his dissertation about ancient Egyptian painted shrouds, he was “Atracció de Talent” (VLC/Campus) predoctoral fellow at the department of Ancient History and Written Culture of the University of Valencia.

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Jónatan Ortiz-García holds a BA in History, a MA in Cultural Heritage (Classical Archaeology), and a PhD in Cultural Heritage (Egyptology) from the University of Valencia. While working on his dissertation about ancient Egyptian painted shrouds, he was “Atracció de Talent” (VLC/Campus) predoctoral fellow at the department of Ancient History and Written Culture of the University of Valencia. His main research areas are religious cloths and clothing, funerary beliefs and practices, as well as religious interactions in ancient Egypt.

He has developed funded research stays at the University of Oxford, the British Museum, and Museum of Byzantine Art in Berlin. His publications include peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and co-editions of scientific meeting proceedings. He has presented papers in several international congresses and seminars, and is preparing his PhD thesis for publication.

His archaeological fieldwork experience extends from Bronze Age to Roman times excavations in Spain and Egypt.

Carmen Díaz Castro

Egyptology


Carmen Díaz Castro studied a BA in History at the University of Alcalá, obtaining her degree recently in 2017. During her final BA year, she attended “Middle Egyptian I: Introduction to the hieroglyphic writing”, and demonstrated her strong interest on the fields of Ancient History and Egyptology; not in vain, she decided to write her degree paper about Alexander the Great and his adaptation to local traditions.

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Carmen Díaz Castro studied a BA in History at the University of Alcalá, obtaining her degree recently in 2017. During her final BA year, she attended an extramural course dealing with the nature of ancient Egyptian language and hieroglyphic system called “Middle Egyptian I: Introduction to the hieroglyphic writing”, offered by UAH professor Antonio Morales. She has demonstrated her strong interest on the fields of Ancient History and Egyptology; not in vain, she decided to write her degree paper about Alexander the Great and his adaptation to local traditions when becoming a pharaoh in the country of the Two-Lands, a study directed by the UAH professor Fco. Javier Gómez Espelosín.

Currently, she is working on her Master in Education, with the goal of acquiring the necessary experience and fundamental skills to become a teacher and the concurrent purpose of specializing on Alexander´s period, mainly on the Egyptian side. Carmen is strongly interested on the funerary rites and iconography found on the walls, chambers, and crypts of the mortuary complexes, including the particularly significant rites of mummification and the meaning of such a practice for the deceased in his postmortem experience.

Carmen Díaz is the recipient of one of the five fellowships offered by the MKTP in 2017 to UAH students specialized on History, Humanities, Archaeology, or Architecture.

Sofía Illana López

Egyptology


Sofía Illana López is a final-year student in the BA degree in History. She initiated her studies in 2014 at the Universidad de Alcalá de Henares. Currently, she is finishing her studies in History with a visiting European fellowship at the Université Rennes 2 (Bretagne, France).

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Sofía Illana López is a final-year student in the BA degree in History. She initiated her studies in 2014 at the Universidad de Alcalá de Henares. Currently, she is finishing her studies in History with a visiting European fellowship at the Université Rennes 2 (Bretagne, France).

She has collaborated in different archaeological projects. In 2015 she took part in the International Course in Archaeology offered by the Consorcio de la Ciudad Monumental de Mérida, digging in the areas of the amphitheatre and the extramural zone. She has been a member of other projects such as the excavations in Contrebia Leucade (Aguilar del Río Alhama, La Rioja, Spain) and the Valle de los Neandertales (Pinilla del Valle, Region of Madrid, Spain).

Sofía Illana is the recipient of one of the five fellowships offered by the MKTP in 2017 to UAH students specialized on History, Humanities, Archaeology, or Architecture.

Marta Arranz Cárcamo

Egyptology


Marta Arranz studied a BA in History at the University Complutense of Madrid, and an MA in Archaeology and Heritage at the University Autonoma of Madrid. Currently, she is working on her PhD in the same university. Her main field of study is the iconography and nature of the snake-goddesses in ancient Egypt. She is Research Associate in the Middle Kingdom Theban Project at the University of Alcalá.

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Marta Arranz studied a BA in History at the University Complutense of Madrid, and an MA in Archaeology and Heritage at the University Autonoma of Madrid. Currently, she is working on her PhD in the same university. Her main field of study is the iconography and nature of the snake-goddesses in ancient Egypt. She is Research Associate in the Middle Kingdom Theban Project at the University of Alcalá.

Marta has participated in several archaeological excavations in Spain and Italy, especially in the sanctuary of Diana in Nemi (Rome), as well as in the Roman village in Cascia (Perugia). In Spain she has collaborated in the excavation works conducted in an Iberian settlement in the site of Dancos (Lillo, Toledo). In 2015, she received the Research Award from the Spanish Association of Egyptology (AEDE), which will result in a publication about some aspects of her research on the snake-goddesses in ancient Egypt. In addition, she is working for the Middle Kingdom Theban Project, mainly on the digitalisation of fieldwork materials, as well as on the identification and registration of the major individuals of the period, and the sources, and documents related to each of them.

Eman Zidan

Conservation


Eman H. Zidan is object conservator and works for the Ministry of Antiquities at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo (EMC) since 2008. Among her recent duties, she has participated in several projects and exhibitions at the EMC. Currently she is specialized on monitoring environmental conditions and developing preventive conservation strategies for the collection of EMC.

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Eman H. Zidan is object conservator and works for the Ministry of Antiquities at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo (EMC) since 2008. Among her recent duties, she has participated in several projects and exhibitions at the EMC. Currently she is specialized on monitoring environmental conditions and developing preventive conservation strategies for the collection of EMC. She has been awarded –together with Dr. Hannelore Roemich, Chairman of the Conservation Center at the Institute of Fine Arts in New York University– the Antiquities Endowment Fund from the American Research Center in Egypt for the design and development of a project entitled Environmental Conditions and Long Term Preservation of the Collection at the Egyptian Museum: Advanced Training in Preventative Conservation in cooperation with New York University and the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

She received her BA in Archaeological Conservation from Cairo University in 2007, and is currently working on her MA at Fayoum University, where she is focusing on the application of low-cost preventive conservation strategies to adapt the existing exhibition at the EMC. In addition, she has participated in several excavation in Egypt (Abydos, Amarna, Luxor) as a site conservator.

She has also participated in the Museum Training School at the University College London (UCL), dealing with the engagement of local community in museum education, and she volunteers in raising public awareness towards Egypt’s cultural heritage through numerous campaigns and workshops for adults, children, and people with disabilities. Furthermore, she worked as editor in chief of Archaeology Times Online Magazine (2011-2014), which aimed to promote the most current issues concerning archaeology, heritage, and art. She has given papers at national and international conferences and congresses in Egypt, United States, Italy, England, Greece, and Canada.

Mohamed Hussein

Conservation


Mohamed Hussein holds a BA in Archaeological Conservation from South Valley University, Department of Art, Restoration, and Conservation (2005), and a Master in Restoration and Conservation of Antiquities from the same university (2010). He has been a conservator at the Egyptian Museum of Cairo since 2012 until now, and has worked as intern conservator for several projects in ARCE (2012).

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Mohamed Hussein holds a BA in Archaeological Conservation from South Valley University, Department of Art, Restoration, and Conservation (2005), and a Master in Restoration and Conservation of Antiquities from the same university (2010). He has been a conservator at the Egyptian Museum of Cairo since 2012 until now, and has worked as intern conservator for several projects in ARCE (2012).

He has recently published an article on the conservation treatment for coffins, considering the case of the wooden coffin of Pami. This study is the result of a conference participation on ancient Egyptian coffins at Cambridge University.

He specializes on particular conservation treatments, mainly related to the preservation of both organics (wood, papyrus) and inorganics (stone, metal, pottery). In the MKTP Mohamed will contribute in the duties of conservation, preservation, and storage of the findings.

Rawda Abd el-Hady

Conservation


Rawda holds a BA in Egyptology from Alexandria University (2013), a Diploma in Archaeological Conservation from Fayum University (2016), and an MA in Heritage Conservation and Site Management from Helwan University and the BTU Brandenburg University of Technology (2018). She especializes in the conservation of objects and works as conservator in the Museum of Archaeology (Alexandria University).

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Rawda holds a BA in Egyptology from Alexandria University (2013), a Diploma in Archaeological Conservation from Fayum University (2016), and an MA in Heritage Conservation and Site Management from Helwan University and the BTU Brandenburg University of Technology (2018). She especializes in the conservation of objects, mainly manuscripts, written documents, and antique books, and has also been trained in preventive conservation, and condition assessment. She works as conservator and registrar in the Museum of Archaeology of the Faculty of Arts in Alexandria University.

She has worked in the planification and organization of the exhibition “Revive the Archaeology Museum”, and has arranged and help to design the first database of the University Museum. In addition, she has contributed in administrative tasks and as a data entry specialist and researcher in the Center of Coptic Studies in the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, where she has been focusing on the conservation and restoration of manuscripts. In addition, she has been lecturing for the UNESCO on the assessment of conservation conditions and environmental control of collections (2016), and has organized a museum study program with the Egypt Exploration Society (2016).

As a member of the MKTP, she contributes to the restoration and conservation of the archaeological objects found in the excavations.

Ahmed Tarek

Conservation


Ahmed Tarek is a conservator at the Conservation Center of the Grand Egyptian Museum (GEM-CC). He is especially interested on the conservation of organic artifacts, in particular papyrus and paper.

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Ahmed Tarek is a conservator at the Conservation Center of the Grand Egyptian Museum (GEM-CC). He is especially interested on the conservation of organic artifacts, in particular papyrus and paper. In Japan, he studied the Japanese technique for paper conservation, which he recently applied to the treatment of a 3.5 meter long papyrus from ancient Egypt. He has also finished his masters thesis on the evaluation of materials used in the conservation of organic material, in particular bone and ivory. In addition, he took part in the restoration of several coffins from the Tell el-Amarna excavations.

Dina Serova

Epigraphy


Dina Serova holds a Bachelor of Arts in Archaeology and Cultural History of Northeast Africa from Humboldt University Berlin and a Master of Arts in Egyptology from Freie University Berlin. She is currently enrolled as a PhD candidate at Humboldt University, as she writes her dissertation about “Nudity in ancient Egypt: A diachronic analysis on the basis of written and pictorial evidence”.

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Dina Serova holds a Bachelor of Arts in Archaeology and Cultural History of Northeast Africa from Humboldt University Berlin and a Master of Arts in Egyptology from Freie University Berlin. She is currently enrolled as a PhD candidate at Humboldt University, as she writes her dissertation about “Nudity in ancient Egypt: A diachronic analysis on the basis of written and pictorial evidence” in which she explores how the human body and its exposure have been perceived in ancient and modern. Her main areas of interest are the theory and practice of archaeological research, ethnography, and linguistic studies.

Dina has participated in several field projects mainly in Sudan (Musawwarat es-Sufra, Meroe) as general assistant and epigrapher with the focus on the documentation of graffiti on site. Having worked as a student assistant at Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften in the project “Strukturen und Transformationen des Wortschatzes der ägyptischen Sprache” in 2013−2014, and at the German Archaeological Institute (DAI) in 2015−2016, she gained a profound experience with the processing of hieroglyphic and hieratic texts, as well as archive and database related work.

Carlos Gracia Zamacona

Epigraphy


Carlos Gracia Zamacona (PhD in Egyptology and Linguistics, École Pratique des Hautes Études, 2008) is a specialist in linguistics and Coffin Texts, the largest mortuary corpus from ancient Egypt (c. 2000-1500 BCE). His interests are verbal semantics, metaphorical thinking, textual patterns and uses, graphemics, and religious thought as well as its reinterpretation.

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Carlos Gracia Zamacona (PhD in Egyptology and Linguistics, École Pratique des Hautes Études, 2008) is a specialist in linguistics and Coffin Texts, the largest mortuary corpus from ancient Egypt (c. 2000-1500 BCE). His interests are verbal semantics, metaphorical thinking, textual patterns and uses, graphemics (writing and its connections to language and semiotics), and religious thought as well as its reinterpretation. His general approach is corpus-based, empirical.

Among his scholarly publications, two articles on spatial expression have found a relevant echo among the specialists in the field of Egyptian language. He is also the author of a handbook of Middle Egyptian in Spanish (2nd edition in 2017).

He has taught Egyptology at the University of Barcelona, and seminars at the Archaeological National Museum in Madrid among other institutions.

He is a reaserach associate at the Équipe d’Accueil Égypte ancienne: archéologie, langue, religion (EA 4519, École Pratique des Hautes Études, Paris Sciences et Lettres Research University), and has been awarded research fellowships at Università degli Studi La Sapienza (Rome), EPHE (Paris), Université de Liège, Academia de España (Rome), and Institut Français d’Archéologie Orientale (Cairo).

Flavio Celis D’Amico

Architecture


Flavio Celis obtained his PhD in Architecture at the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid in 1998. Between 2001 and 2005 he was Lecturer in Design and Drawing in the Architectural Degree at the School of Architecture in the University of Alcalá. From 2005 he is Professor in Sustainability Architecture, mainly teaching and conducting research in the Master Degree in Architecture developed at the University of Alcalá.

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As a researcher at the University of Alcalá, he has participated in several projects concerned with architectural heritage and sustainability architecture. He has given multiple courses and conferences in universities in Spain, Italy, Portugal, Brasil, Chile, México, Perú, and China. He has participated in two patents, and has contributed in more than 20 national and international research projects whose results have been published in peer-review journals and chapters in books. The projects have been concerned with actions in Spain, Italy, France, Portugal, Greece, Czech Republic, Chile, Mexico, Brazil, China, and India.

As an architect and researcher, he has mainly focused in Architectural Heritage and Sustainability Architecture. He is co-author, with Ernesto Echeverria, of the rehabilitation of the Prince Barrack's as a Learning and Research Center of the Alcalá University. This project received the First Architectural Prize of Alcalá de Henares City Council in 2014. Together with Ernesto Echevarría, Flavio will work on the 3D reconstruction and planimetry of the tombs of Henenu (TT 313) and Ipi (TT 315) in the MKTP concession.

Ernesto Echeverría Valiente

Architecture


Ernesto Echeverría Valiente is Associate Professor in Design and Geometry at the Architecture degree of the School of Architecture (University of Alcala, Spain). He received his BA in Architecture from the University Politechnique of Madrid (Spain) in 1990. He obtained his PhD in Architecture at the University Politechnique of Madrid in 2005 about "The University campus of Alcala de Henares”.

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Ernesto Echeverría Valiente is Associate Professor in Design and Geometry at the Architecture degree of the School of Architecture (University of Alcala, Spain). He received his BA in Architecture from the University Politechnique of Madrid (Spain) in 1990. He obtained his PhD in Architecture at the University Politechnique of Madrid in 2005. Ernesto’s dissertation title is “The University campus of Alcala de Henares: analysis and evolution.” His main areas of interest include Heritage’s documentation and Conservation linked with Bioclimatic Architecture and Environmental sustainability. At moment occupy the charge of University of Alcala Department of Architecture Director.

He has participated in several projects linked with Heritage and Sostenibility as Architect and researcher of the University of Alcala. He has worked in Spain (El Escorial, Madrid, Cifuentes, Alcalá de Henares, Guadalajara), and some places around the world: Brasil, Italy, Portugal, Chile, México, Guatemala focused in Heritage’ Conservation and documentation, or Environmental sustainability He has participated in 2 patents, and more than 20 national and international researches projects which results have been published in peer-review journals and chapters of books. (Spain, Italy, France, Portugal, Greece, Czech Republic, Chile, Mexico, Brazil, China, India).

Delaminet Meza Hung

Architecture


Delaminet is a BA student on Architectural and Urban Design at the University of Alcalá. Her main academic interests are semiotics in architecture, specifically of mythology area, and biomimetic architecture.

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Delaminet is a BA student on Architectural and Urban Design at the University of Alcalá. Her main academic interests are semiotics in architecture, specifically of mythology area, and biomimetic architecture.

Delaminet Meza is the recipient of one of the five fellowships offered by the MKTP in 2017 to UAH students specialized on History, Humanities, Archaeology, or Architecture.

Daniel Spinelli Arroyo

Architecture


Daniel Spinelli holds a BA in Architecture from the University of Alcalá (2006) with a BA paper entitled "Urban Corridors: the case of the Henares Corridor as a territorial intervention". He is currently working on his Master thesis on Architecture at the University of Alcalá.

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Daniel Spinelli holds a BA in Architecture from the University of Alcalá (2006) with a BA paper entitled "Urban Corridors: the case of the Henares Corridor as a territorial intervention". After working in several studios of architecture focused on small and medium sized projects, he spent a year in the University of the Republic in Uruguay (Montevideo). He is currently working on his Master thesis on Architecture at the University of Alcalá.

Because of his interest on the history, art, and architecture of ancient Egypt, he has been selected as one of the recipients of the MKTP fellowship for Architecture School students at the University of Alcalá, supporting his participation in this fourth season of archaeological excavation.

Manuel Carrillo Rodríguez

Forensic Anthropology


Manuel Carrillo got his degree in Medicine and Surgery (MD) from the University Complutense in Madrid. In addition, he has a Master degree in Physical and Forensic Anthropology (MSc) from the University of Granada and a PhD from the University of Alcalá. He passed his certified residence training in Legal and Forensic Medicine.

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Manuel Carrillo got his degree in Medicine and Surgery (MD) from the University Complutense in Madrid. In addition, he has a Master degree in Physical and Forensic Anthropology (MSc) from the University of Granada and a PhD from the University of Alcalá. He passed his certified residence training in Legal and Forensic Medicine. In addition, he has worked as a forensic pathologist for the National Court of Spain, as well as for various local national court services in the Community of Madrid. He is Professor of Legal and Forensic Medicine at the University of Alcalá since 2006.

His is mainly interested on forensic anthropology and pathology, and above all he focused on paleopathology and physical anthropology as applied to the study of human remains in Antiquity.

Enrique Dorado Fernández

Forensic Anthropology


Enrique Dorado received his BSc and MD in Medicine and Surgery, as well as his PhD in Medicine and Surgery from the University Complutense in Madrid. In addition, he has obtained several degrees in his prolific career, such as MSc in Physical and Forensic Anthropology (UCM); Especialist degree in Legal and Forensic Medicine; and MSc in Medical Law and Bioethics (UCLM).

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Enrique Dorado received his BSc and MD in Medicine and Surgery, as well as his PhD in Medicine and Surgery from the University Complutense in Madrid. In addition, he has obtained several degrees in his prolific career: MSc in Physical and Forensic Anthropology at the UCM; Especialist degree in Legal and Forensic Medicine; MSc in Medical Law and Bioethics (UCLM); Certificate for direction of x-rays medical centres; and Diploma on Archeozoology, offered by the Centre of Near Eastern and Late Antiquity Studies.

As a forensic doctor, Enrique Dorado is nowadays responsible for the Laboratory of forensic anthropology of the Anatomic Forensic Institute in Madrid and Assistant Professor in the Department of Toxicology and Medical Law at the University Complutense in Madrid. He has been Assistant Professor in the Department of Medical Sciences and Sociomedical Siences at the University of Alcalá, where he is currently Honorific Professor in Practicum. Additionally, he has worked as assistant professor for forensic anthropology in the medical program at the University Rey Juan Carlos in madrid, as well as in the UAM, Alfonso X el Sabio, Miguel Hernández in Alicante and Francisco de Vitoria.

Enrique Dorado has supervised several PhD dissertations, BA degree papers and master thesis, all of them related to anthropological studies. Regarding his publications, Enrique is the author of multiple contributions to books and journals associated with forensic medicine and anthropology; in addition, he has offered numerous talks in national and international congresses and workshops. In the historical side of his work, Enrique has participated in the study of the mummified body of Sor Úrsula Micaela Morata, the examination of the mummified body of Doctor Velasco’s daugther, and the analysis of General Prim’s corpse. In his position at the Laboratory of Anthropology, he conducts studies in cases associated with legal and court matters, as well as research on the field of identification and pathologies. As an anthropologist, Enrique has collaborated in various archaeological excavations.

Teresa Bardají

Geology


Teresa Bardají is a geologist and geomorphologist currently teaching at the University of Alcalá (Madrid, Spain) as full professor. Her main research lines are related to Quaternary environmental evolution in Mediterranean and Atlantic settings, not only in Spain but also in other countries such as Tunisia, Egypt, Morocco and Cape Verde.

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Teresa Bardají is a geologist and geomorphologist currently teaching at the University of Alcalá (Madrid, Spain) as full professor. Her main research lines are related to Quaternary environmental evolution in Mediterranean and Atlantic settings, not only in Spain but also in other countries such as Tunisia, Egypt, Morocco and Cape Verde. Within this wide scientific aim, her research has been focused in sea-level changes and palaeoenvironmental evolution during the latter interglacial stages, as well as in the analysis of environmental, geological and archaeological effects of earthquakes. In the last few years she has collaborated with different archaeological teams in Egypt and Morocco, where besides the required geological advice she has been involved in the reconstruction of the ancient landscapes and environmental changes. Part of her professional experience is related to thematic mapping on the geology of quaternary deposits, neotectonics, active faults, geomorphology and active processes. The areas where she has developed these projects cover different geodynamic settings in Spain, from the more tectonically stable areas of western Spain, to the most active ones in the Betic Cordillera.

Her research carried out in the last 25 years has resulted in more than 30 contributions to SCI journals, about 100 publications in national and international journals and books, and around 90 contributions to national or international congresses. She has been a member in 20 national and 6 international projects funded by public or private organisms, leading 5 of them, and has benefitted from 10 research contracts with private companies and/or public administrations. Besides these economically funded projects, she has been involved in 8 IGCP projects (UNESCO), devoted to sea-level and coastal changes, and to palaeoseismicity and archaeoseismicity.

Patricia Mora Riudavets

Photography


Patricia Mora holds a BA degree in History from the University of Barcelona and a MA in Egyptology from the University of Liverpool, with a dissertation entitled “Women that clap their hands in the Old Kingdom”. While working on her degree, she discovered her passion for photography and attended photography courses in the Faculty of Fine Arts from the University of Barcelona

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Patricia Mora holds a BA degree in History from the University of Barcelona and a MA in Egyptology from the University of Liverpool, with a dissertation entitled “Women that clap their hands in the Old Kingdom”.

While working on her degree, she discovered her passion for photography and attended photography courses in the Faculty of Fine Arts from the University of Barcelona. A few years later, she completed the Annual Course of Photographic Technique at the Aula de Especialización Fotográfica (Barcelona), where she mainly learnt techniques for professional lighting and digital improvement. Recently, she has completed a training course on Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) at the University College London.

Bringing together two of her greatest passions, Egyptology and photography, she has worked as a professional archaeological photographer in several national and international archaeological missions in Egypt: in Asasif with the Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, at Qubbet el Hawa with the University of Jaén, in Deir el-Bersha with the KU Leuven, at the Elephantine Island with the Schweizer Institut für Ägyptische Bauforschung und Altertumskunde in Kairo, and in Syria, in the site of Deir ez-Zor with the University da Coruña.

Miriam Krutzsch

Papyrology


Myriam Krutzch is papyrus conservator of the papyrology collection of the Egyptian Museum of Berlín (Staatliche Museen zu Berlin / Stiftung Preußischer Kulturbesitz). She has extensive experience in the reconstruction and conservation of papyrus, paper and books. She has worked in collections from around the world and she has also collaborated with various archaeological missions in Egypt.

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Myriam Krutzch is papyrus conservator of the papyrology collection of the Egyptian Museum of Berlín (Staatliche Museen zu Berlin / Stiftung Preußischer Kulturbesitz). She has extensive experience in the reconstruction and conservation of papyrus, paper and books. She has worked in collections from around the world and she has also collaborated with various archaeological missions in Egypt. As a member of the MKTP she will analyse the papyrus fragments found in the upper courtyard of the tomb of Henenu (TT 313) during the excavation of the last season.

Myriam has a wide teaching experience. She has taught courses on the conservation of papyrus, Folding techniques of ancient Egyptian texts and papyrus manufacture at institutions of Austria, Denmark, Germany, Israel, Japan, Poland, Spain, Switzerland and USA.

Kei Yamamoto

Ceramics


Kei Yamamoto holds a double-major Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology and Asian and Middle Eastern Studies from the University of Pennsylvania. He then obtained Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations at the University of Toronto. His doctoral dissertation examined the Middle Kingdom pottery assemblage from North Abydos.

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Kei Yamamoto holds a double-major Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology and Asian and Middle Eastern Studies from the University of Pennsylvania. He then obtained Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations at the University of Toronto. His doctoral dissertation examined the Middle Kingdom pottery assemblage from North Abydos, analyzing the chronological development of the ceramic vessels, their functions in light of the archaeological contexts, and their implications on the pottery industry at the site.

Kei taught courses on ancient Egyptian history at the University of Toronto, but he has also worked extensively in museums. While a doctoral candidate, he served as a part-time project technician and instructor at the Royal Ontario Museum, documenting Egyptian and Sudanese artifacts and teaching courses on the pharaonic civilization. Thereafter he lived in Cairo for a year, working as a text-writing Egyptologist at the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization and the Grand Egyptian Museum. Through international collaboration, he helped these two new museum projects develop the exhibition content of their permanent galleries. He then worked for about five years at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, first as an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow and later as Lila Acheson Wallace Research Associate. He assisted with the organization of the traveling exhibition Ancient Egyptian Queens and Goddesses and co-curated the major special exhibition Ancient Egypt Transformed: The Middle Kingdom. He is currently a research specialist at the University of Arizona, where he is working on a multi-disciplinary research, conservation, exhibition, and publication of an early Middle Kingdom coffin.

Since 2001, Kei has participated in many seasons of archaeological fieldwork at multiple sites, including Tell Tebilla in the Delta. He excavated Middle Kingdom memorial chapels outside the temple precinct of Osiris in North Abydos and the mortuary complex of Senwosret III in South Abydos. He has also been working at the pyramid complex of Senwosret III and the adjacent cemetery of court officials in Dahshur North. Being a versatile worker, he has contributed to these projects as an Egyptologist, unit supervisor, registrar, illustrator, and ceramicist. It is mainly in the last capacity that Kei joins the Middle Kingdom Theban Project.

Inma López Hita

3D Scanning


Inma López obtained her BSc in Engineering, Industrial Design and Development in the Technical School of Engineering at the Universidad Politécnica in Madrid. She works as an engineer on industrial design and has especialized on digitalization with 3D scanner, inverted engineering, and auditive fabrication.

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Inma López obtained her BSc in Engineering, Industrial Design and Development in the Technical School of Engineering at the Universidad Politécnica in Madrid. She works as an engineer on industrial design and has especialized on digitalization with 3D scanner, inverted engineering, and auditive fabrication. Soon the 3D technology got Inma´s attention and became her hobby, although later this focus became her main professional focus.

Besides her studies on engineering in industrial design, Inma has also worked with the treatment of files proceeding from digitalization and 3D scanner, design, graphic, and quality control programs. She has worked as technian for digital design and auditive fabrication in biomedical engineering (Ortho 3D) and on industrial design by computer with Solid Works, Autodesk, and inverted enginering with Design X (Sicnova 3D). In addition, she has contributed to scientic research with beta projects and in projects of social design in Medialab Prado. Furthermore, she feels much curiosity and interest on artistic direction and scenography.

Inma has joined the MKTP as specialist on 3D design and scanner with the purpose of examining the jars found in the mummification deposit and obtaining all the available information for their later replication.